506 – White space

This weeks image deals with the concept of white space and symmetry. Positioning graphics and text for maximum impact must consider the empty space as well. “Space can direct the eye to important information by chinking and separating instructional elements…”(Lohr, 2011). Space can also work against a designer; if not carefully planned space can trap the viewers eye in an area of negative space that detracts from the direction of the image. This week it has become clear that space can be used to clarify text quickly, can influence a viewers perception of time and contributes to an images sense of symmetry. My image this week outlines the requirements of the e-portfolio students must prepare for their final assessment.

The image provides the essential criteria for the e-portfolio surrounded by a graphic which represents an electronic portfolio. I used careful alignments, colour, contrast and white/grey space to maximize impact.

references:

Lohr, L. L. (2003). Creating graphics for learning and performance: Lessons in visual literacy. Prentice Hall Press

“Folder” image source:http://tinyurl.com/cwqv67e (Retrieved November 8, 2011)

Advertisements

506 – Organization

The intent of the assignment this week was to use organizational elements such as hierarchy to create an image that represents an introduction or overview of the contents of our unit of instruction. The concept of hierarchy deals with many of the elements we have examined already in the course such as size, shape, contrast, proximity, alignment, figure-ground, and chunking. Organization of a graphic allows the designer to quickly communicate to the viewer/learner what is important about the image and guides the viewer’s eye through the image emphasizing its most important elements. Tables and graphs are used often to communicate information and this chapter offered a great deal of information on how to convey your information in a concise, impact full manner.

My introductory image is a parody of a “Time” magazine cover. I was teaching a unit that involved the creation of a fictitious magazine cover in a Photography class at the time of this assignment and thought that a cover would be a perfect way to introduce the concepts to the learners and pique their curiosity at the same time. The cover uses size, colour, contrast, alignment to draw the viewer into the image and leads the eye from the top down.

references:

Lohr, L. L. (2003). Creating graphics for learning and performance: Lessons in visual literacy. Prentice Hall Press

“People” image source:http://www.freepik.com (Retrieved November 2, 2011)

“Light bulb” image source: http://tinyurl.com/3wbes8v (Retrieved November 1, 2011)

506-Colour

This weeks assignment was to create an image using concepts of colour and depth to enhance instruction and learning. I choose to create an image that would help learners in my unit of instruction identify some risk factors when choosing a KIVA loan candidate. The topic deals with making a financial decision, therefore I choose to base the concept of the image around a financial data chart. When working with colour it is clear that choices must be made carefully and can be inspired based on the colour wheel, or from nature, art, or from a template of complimentary colour. Colour can also be chose for a psychological impact. I choose to use a bold font in red to grad the viewers attention and to signify the importance of the decision involved with the process of risk analysis. The red indicator line in the image also is symbolic of importance. I used white space and black icons, which represent three factors in doing risk analysis, to contrast the red. It was interesting to note in the reading this week how colour can influence decision making and selection and also can be used to signify importance. Again Emphasized in this weeks reading was the using space in a positive way to de-clutter and image and emphasize particular elements.

references:

Lohr, L. L. (2003). Creating graphics for learning and performance: Lessons in visual literacy. Prentice Hall Press

“man” image source:http://tinyurl.com/3r7fjae (Retrieved October 22, 2011)

“bank” image source:http://tinyurl.com/3mw3z5c (Retrieved October 22, 2011)

“Africa” image source:http://www.flickr.com/photos/theartguy/2444535728/(Retrieved October 22, 2011)

506 – Selection

This weeks image uses concepts from the reading that deal with enhancing selection for the learner. The image I created uses a plain white background and a grey world map, which minimizes distraction to the viewer and forces the eye to the figure; the process of micro-financing. I also used colour to coordinate and combine images in the mind of the reader. I have mentioned in previous posts how it has been interesting finding theory behind designing images that for some people are intuitive. I think before reading this chapter I have unconsciously used this concepts of minimizing distraction and reducing cognitive load in most of my images thus far. I tend to subscribe to the “less is more” school of thought, and usually try to reduce much of my work down to what is truly needed; not just in graphic design, but also in my teaching and writing. In designing instruction I carefully consider each element to make sure it is integral to the overall objects…if in doubt leave it out! This is a difficult concept for early writers who like to throw as much information at a topic as possible in a desperate attempt to cover the topic.

This is my favorite image I have designed in this course so far. Out of all of them, I think this one is the most effective in its simplicity, colour design and message.

References:

For a complete list of references please link to:

http://edtech2.boisestate.edu/barryjanzen/502/figure-ground.html

506-CARP

This weeks assignment was to develop an image for the proposed unit of instruction using the principles of contrast, alignment, repetition, and proximity. I think it is important to stress that these four  elements are great concepts to consider when developing an image for learning, however they do not all necessarily have to be used in every image. As a photography teacher I make it a point to teach my students to be aware and pay attention to design principles, but also to remember that they are only principles and not steadfast rules. Sometimes breaking these guidelines to make an impact-full image or photograph is worth the risk. My image this week was originally built on a black background which, as we all know, is problematic when designing text and graphics for readability. I felt as though it was successful and had impact even though it did not have 100% contrast. Some of the text required effort to make out, but that was part of the appeal of the image to me. Many of my peers commented on the readability issue and so I changed it…reluctantly.

You be the judge.

references:

Lohr, L. L. (2003). Creating graphics for learning and performance: Lessons in visual literacy. Prentice Hall Press

“Cloud” image source: http://tinyurl.com/66elr2b (Retrieved October 11, 2011)

Edtech 506 – Design Process

The work this week centered around a design model labelled ACE (Analyze, Create, Evaluate) and included the PAT concept (Principles, Actions, and Tools). I found this material timely in that I was also currently working on an assignment in Edtech 506 that required the development of several images that where metaphorical representations of the concepts described in a series of slides. I was also delivering a unit of instruction in a Language Arts class that required the students to find or create images that represented various elements of a short story. Both of these assignments require students to make visual connections between concepts; a process called synectics (Lohr, 2008) as described in the text as “…a set of strategies used to stimulate and enhance creative thought” (Gordon, 1961). Coming up with the ideas for a graphic for learning is, for me the hardest part and using the strategies outlined in the text offered a great starting point for this weeks assignment in 505 and 506. Using metaphor to increase meaning and impact has always been an approach I have used and encourage my students to use.

“Juliet is the sun” Three words that tells us everything we need to know about Romeo’s feelings toward Juliet.

The ACE model is an instructional design model for developing graphics for learning. When the designer is faced with the task of creating a graphic for learning one must analyze by identifying its instructional function, content classification, and consider the type of approach (artistic or heuristic) (Lohr, 2008) It is in the create phase that the designer generates ideas and works with in the PAT model as described above. After completion the graphic is evaluated by assessing its effectiveness, efficiency and appeal.

I have found that It is through the class discussion forum that the graphic can be evaluated much more effectively than through self assessment or even having a colleague look at it. As an artist it can be difficult to objectively evaluate your own work. One gets too close to their creation to see how it can be improved.

Another connection with this weeks material is the relationship between the ADDIE model of Instructional Design and the ACE model for the development of graphics or even strategies for instruction.  Within the design and development phase of instructional design is where a designer can apply the ACE model.

 

References:

Gordon, W.J.(1961) Synectics. New York: Harper & Row.

Lohr, L. L. (2008). Creating graphics for learning and performance: Lessons in visual literacy. Prentice Hall Press

 

EdTech 506 – Shapes

This weeks assignment dealt with the development of effective images for learning using simple and complex shapes. I choose to use the persuasive writing element of my unit as the basis for the image. After considering the concept itself, I choose to use a simplistic colour and shape design concept, utilizing a black to white gradient to symbolize the gradual process of persuasion. With three simple elements as the key points in the graphic I also choose to include a hotspot link to a web page containing more detailed information. Not having created a hotspot image since early in Edtech 502, I had to go back and revisit some of the ins and outs of Dreamweaver. These are the types of assignments/projects I really enjoy doing in the edtech program, creating, experimenting and getting feedback on your work from your colleagues.

I’ve found it fascinating to find principles behind how shapes work in the mind of the learner and how these principles can be used to increase the effectiveness of an image. For example, the mind creates perceptual groupings based on simple shapes (Lohr, 2008), therefore a designer can harness this concept in the design of their image. A designer can use shapes to suggest unity, harmony, process, systems, and focus.

 

References:

Lohr, L. (2008). Creating graphics for learning and performance: lessons in visual literacy. Pearson/Merrill/Prentice Hall.

EdTech 506 – Post #1


Graphics: As a photography and media arts teacher I discuss principles of design and what makes images effective with my students all the time. What I am learning from this course is the application of good graphics for increased understanding in learning. I am also intrigued by the connection to instructional design and learning theory presented in the text this week. Using well designed images in conjunction with the principles of cognitive load theory to address learning styles allows instructional designers to produce images for optimum impact. When designing images many people seem to have an intrinsic ability to create something aesthetically pleasing; however, if a designer can combine aesthetic appeal with an understanding of concepts such as chunking, cognitive load theory, and information processing theory, they are much more likely to design an image with lasting impact on the learner. The designer must use visual strategies to appeal to the viewer through recognition, and find ways to allow the information contained in the image to process itself through short term memory and remain in long term memory. Images need to be created for learning that connect with verbal and visual memory and that translate into understanding through meaning.

References:
Lohr, L. (2008). Creating Graphics for Learning and Performance (2nd Edition ed.). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Education.
Image: http://www.mdpi.com/1424-8220/9/9/7374/