506-CARP

This weeks assignment was to develop an image for the proposed unit of instruction using the principles of contrast, alignment, repetition, and proximity. I think it is important to stress that these four  elements are great concepts to consider when developing an image for learning, however they do not all necessarily have to be used in every image. As a photography teacher I make it a point to teach my students to be aware and pay attention to design principles, but also to remember that they are only principles and not steadfast rules. Sometimes breaking these guidelines to make an impact-full image or photograph is worth the risk. My image this week was originally built on a black background which, as we all know, is problematic when designing text and graphics for readability. I felt as though it was successful and had impact even though it did not have 100% contrast. Some of the text required effort to make out, but that was part of the appeal of the image to me. Many of my peers commented on the readability issue and so I changed it…reluctantly.

You be the judge.

references:

Lohr, L. L. (2003). Creating graphics for learning and performance: Lessons in visual literacy. Prentice Hall Press

“Cloud” image source: http://tinyurl.com/66elr2b (Retrieved October 11, 2011)

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1 Comment

  1. Dr. Hsu

     /  October 19, 2011

    I believe both you and your peers are correct. Your original image has stronger visual impact, but the revised version did much better on readability. What would be your priority?

    Reply

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